Asthma and other atopic diseases in Australian children. Australian arm of the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood

Colin F. Robertson*, Marita F. Dalton, Jennifer K. Peat, Michelle M. Haby, Adrian Bauman, J. Declan Kennedy, Louis I. Landau

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

115 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence of asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis in Australian schoolchildren using the protocol of the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC). Design: Questionnaire-based survey. Setting: Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide (in winter-spring, 1993) and Perth (in winter-spring, 1994). Subjects: All children in school years 1 and 2 (ages 6-7 years) or in year 8 (ages 13-14 years), attending a random sample of 272 schools, stratified by age and city. Main outcome measures: Parent-reported (for 6-7 year olds) or self-reported (for 13-14 year olds) symptoms of atopic disease in the previous 12 months, or ever; treatment of asthma; and country of birth. Results: 10,914 questionnaires were completed for 6-7 year olds and 12,280 for 13-14 year olds (84% and 94% response rates, respectively). Prevalence of wheeze in the past 12 months was 24.6% for the 6-7 year olds and 29.4% for the 13-14 year olds, and, among 6-7 year olds, was significantly higher in boys (27.4%) than girls (21.7%). Children born in Australia were more likely to report current wheeze than those born elsewhere (6-7 year olds: odds ratio [OR], 1.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.55-2.15; and 13-14 year olds: OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.68-2.11). Prevalences of current eczema and allergic rhinitis were 10.9% and 12.0%, respectively, for the 6-7 year olds, and 9.7% and 19.6%, respectively, for the 13-14 year olds. Asthma, eczema and rhinitis coexisted in 1.8% of 6-7 year olds and 2.8% of 13-14 year olds. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that asthma prevalence in Australian schoolchildren is continuing to increase and is higher among Australian-born children than among those born elsewhere. Asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis coexist to a lesser extent than expected. These results form the basis for future Australian and international comparisons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)434-438
Number of pages5
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume168
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 May 1998
Externally publishedYes

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