Braquiópodos del Paleozoico tardío de la sierra Agua Verde, Sonora; implicaciones paleoecológicas y paleogeográficas

Translated title of the contribution: Late Paleozic brachiopods of the Sierra Agua Verde, Sonora; palaeoecological and palaeogeographic implications

José Carlos Jiménez-López*, Francisco Sour-Tovar, Blanca Estela Buitrón-Sánchez, Juan José Palafox-Reyes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The brachiopods Plicatifera sp., Kozlowskia capaci, Linoproductus sp. cf. L. eastoni, Composita sp cf. C. sp. cf. subtilita, Anthracospirifer occiduus (Sadlick, 1960), Hustedia mormoni (Marcou, 1858), and Reticulariina sp., are described for the Late Paleozoic of Sierra Agua Verde, Sonora from the La Joya formation, which is made of limestone, sandy limestone, and chertly limestone, and irregular sandstone and siltstone interbeded. The associated biota includes algae, foraminifers, sponges, corals, bryozoan, gastropods, and crinoids that suggest environmental conditions of carbonate platforms with normal salinity and fluctuating levels of energy and nutrient availability. The distribution analysis of the brachiopods allows to establish the palaeogeographic relationships with fauna of Mexico (Oaxaca, Hidalgo), USA (Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Kansas, Utah, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas), Canada, South America (Bolivia, Peru), Europe (Ireland, Belgium), and Asia (Russia, China, Japan, Indonesia).

Translated title of the contributionLate Paleozic brachiopods of the Sierra Agua Verde, Sonora; palaeoecological and palaeogeographic implications
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)637-650
Number of pages14
JournalRevista Mexicana de Biodiversidad
Volume89
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. All rights reserved.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Late Paleozic brachiopods of the Sierra Agua Verde, Sonora; palaeoecological and palaeogeographic implications'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this