Distribution, habitat association, and activity patterns of medium and large-sized mammals of Sonora, Mexico

Gustavo P. Lorenzana Piña, Reyna A. Castillo Gamez, Carlos A. López González*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite the proximity of Sonora, Mexico, to the United States, the mammalian fauna of Sonora has been poorly investigated, and many of the biological and ecological characteristics of these animals remain unknown. From July 1999 to August 2001, we carried out a mammalian inventory using camera traps surveys in order to provide information on the occurrence, distribution, habitat association, and activity patterns of medium and large-sized terrestrial mammals in the three major habitat types of the Sierra Madre Occidental foothills in east-central Sonora: (1) Sinaloan thornscrub (ST), (2) Oak woodland (OW), and (3) thornscrub-woodland ecotones (TW). Over 2348 trap-nights, we obtained 897 photographic records, documenting 18 species of wild mammals. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), mountain lion (Puma concolor), and coyote (Canis latrans) were the most frequently recorded and widely distributed species. In addition, we documented the presence of two endangered species, the jaguar (Panthern onca) and ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), as well as a threatened species, the badger (Taxidea taxus).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-357
Number of pages4
JournalNatural Areas Journal
Volume24
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Keywords

  • Activity patterns
  • Distribution
  • Habitat association
  • Mammals
  • Mexico
  • Sonora

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