Influence of electrostatic interactions on the fibrillation process of human serum albumin

Josué Juárez, Sonia Goy López, Adriana Cambón, Pablo Taboada*, Víctor Mosquera

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

98 Scopus citations

Abstract

The fibrillation propensity of the multidomain protein human serum albumin (HSA) has been analyzed under physiological and acidic conditions at room and elevated temperatures with varying ionic strengths by different spectroscopic techniques. The kinetics of fibril formation under the different solution conditions and the structures of resulting fibrillar aggregates were also determined. In this way, we have observed that fibril formation is largely affected by electrostatic shielding: at physiological pH, fibrillation is progressively more efficient and faster in the presence of up to 50 mM NaCl; meanwhile, at larger salt concentrations, excessive shielding and further enhancement of the solution hydrophobicity might involve a change in the energy landscape of the aggregation process, which makes the fibrillation process difficult. In contrast, under acidic conditions, a continuous progressive enhancement of HSA fibrillation is observed as the electrolyte concentration in solution increases. Both the distinct ionization and initial structural states of the protein before incubation may be the origin of this behavior. CD, FT-IR, and tryptophan fluorescence spectra seem to confirm this picture by monitoring the structural changes in both protein tertiary and secondary structures along the fibrillation process. On the other hand, the fibrillation of HSA does not show a lag phase except at pH 3.0 in the absence of added salt. Finally, differences in the structure of the intermediates and resulting fibrils under the different conditions are also elucidated by TEM and FT-IR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10521-10529
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume113
Issue number30
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

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