Relación entre ingreso familiar, gastro y consumo de alimentos en zonas urbanas marginadas de Sonora, México.

Translated title of the contribution: Relation between familial income, expenditure and food consumption in marginal urban zones of Sonora, Mexico

P. Wong*, I. Higuera, M. E. Valencia

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research project in urban marginal areas of the City of Hermosillo in Sonora, Mexico, analyzes certain socioeconomic factors taking into consideration the relationship between household income, expense and consumption of food. The study is based on information collected in a 24-hour recall survey carried out for all members of the family, frequency of consumption of foods, and a socioeconomic questionnaire. Expense and consumption of foods was divided into five different income groups and into three classes of foods: basic foods, fresh meat and high-protein foods. The results of the research study show a direct relationship between household income level and expense and consumption of the foods. The income-elasticity of the demand of basic foods was lower than that estimated for high-protein foods, and there was a marked tendency to increase consumption of high-protein foods as family income increased. More than 50% of the calories and proteins were obtained from the basic foods group, even though a large percentage of family food expense was destined for high-protein foods. The study concludes that more research is needed at a macroeconomic level to understand the basic underlying causes of the nutritional problems.

Translated title of the contributionRelation between familial income, expenditure and food consumption in marginal urban zones of Sonora, Mexico
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)391-403
Number of pages13
JournalArchivos Latinoamericanos de Nutricion
Volume34
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1984

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