Use of durum wheat (Triticum Durum L.) with “yellow berry” as an alternative to malts in the production of ale-type beer: Physicochemical, quality of malts, and sensorial analysis

Carlos Armando García-Puebla, Erick Heredia-Olea, Juan Pedro López-Córdova, Ramón Francisco Dórame-Miranda, Cindy Verónica Padilla-Torres, Francisco Rodríguez Félix, Guadalupe Amanda López-Ahumada*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Wheat is one of the most important crops worldwide and contributes to more than 40 million tons produced annually. Durum wheat (DW) with yellow berry (YB) has lower protein and higher starch content in the grains. Thus, it is used to produce pasta and animal feed. In Mexico, access to barley malt is difficult for small and medium-sized brewers. Therefore, due to the characteristics of DW with YB could be a viable option for brewing. The objective was the evaluation of the malting and beer making the quality of the durum wheat (Triticum Durum L.) with “yellow berry”. The wheat was malting laboratory level at 19 °C for 5 days; the YB grains, malt, and two Ale-type beers were analyzed. The YB grain showed a 4% reduction in protein content and an increase in the total starch. The content of enzymes and reducing sugars were higher for YB grain. Also, a higher viscosity, and lower retrogradation values in samples germinated. The FAN and glucose of YB presented significant differences (p < 0.05). The YB beer had 63% preference, mainly influenced by higher acidity, bitterness, and alcohol perception. The YB malt could be a viable option for the brewing process.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103613
JournalJournal of Cereal Science
Volume109
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2023

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